A guide to Rome’s Public Transports

 
When in Rome do as the Romans do.
Especially for what concerns the means of transport!
They will help you move around the city and you will reach museums, squares and many Roman wonders.
I lived in Rome and before that, I was a commuter during the university period.
I can so tell you that they are not very reliable. You will need to check timetables or download applications for your phone in order to help you.
If you find yourself organizing a tour of Rome always consider leaving at least one hour before. So you will reach your place in time and find your way more easily.
But let’s see together this guide to Rome’s public transport and some tips to help you!
Rome will be easy to visit!
 
 

The Roman metro


 

Barberini metro station – WikiCommons

 

The “Eternal City” has a subway network that connects it to sightseeing places and more.
The Roman underground lines move around 762,000 people a day on 60 km of line.
There are 73 stations in total, including 60 underground.
The main metro lines are:
 

1. Line A

This orange-coloured line goes in the Battistini and Anagnina directions. It has 27 stops including one at Termini train station. The other stops will take you to Piazza di Spagna where you will find: Spanish steps, Via del Condotti.
Barberini stop will lead you to the Trevi Fountain. San Giovanni stop for the San Giovanni in Laterano Basilica.
The most popular stops are close to the tourist areas like Cipro for the Vatican Museum;
Without forgetting the Ottaviano stop for St. Peter’s Basilica.
 
 

2. Line B

The blue Line B also intersects with Termini Station.
Line B will take you to the Colosseum, to the Circus Maximus. If you need it also stops at Termini Station where you can catch trains to go everywhere.
Line B that goes to Laurentina will take you to Garbatella and the Basilica of S. Paolo.
 

3. Line C

The green-coloured line C is the most recent. The directions are Clodio – Mazzini and Montecompatri – Pantano.
You can visit the Aurelian Walls, the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme. Without forgetting the Elenian Baths, the National Museum of Musical Instruments. The line stops at the Pigneto area. You will find Street art, Torrione Prenestina Park, Mausoleum and Villa Gordiani.
 

Costs and metro tickets

Image sourced from Flickr

 
To be able to use the metro you need to have tickets.
Otherwise, you risk getting a fine.
The single ticket costs € 1.50. It will allow you to take only one metro journey. One train journey and unlimited bus journeys for 100 minutes after stamping.
 
If you are staying in Rome for more than one day then you will need a pass. This will help you saving money and you’ll be free to visit places without worries
There are several possibilities to choose from.
Let’s see them together:
The ROMA 24H pass lasts 24 hours from the time of stamping for a cost of € 7.
But, the ROME 48H pass with a duration of 48 hours from stamping will cost you € 12.50.
The ROMA 72H pass lasts 72 hours from stamping, for a cost of € 18
Thanks to these tickets you will have unlimited travel according to your choice for 24 – 48 – 72 hours.
 
 

Weekly, monthly or yearly subscription

Image sourced from Flickr

 
If you stay longer you can opt for weekly or monthly tickets. For a weekly ticket, you will spend around € 24 while for the monthly ticket € 35. The monthly open or that they can use more people instead will cost you about € 53. If you stay in Rome for a year you can opt for an annual subscription costing around € 250.
 

Other Roman means of transport

Bus in Rome by BlackCat – Wikimedia Commons

 
If you are staying in the centre of Rome and your hotel is central then you can use other means.
if you want to walk you will gain health but always get help from your GPS so you don’t get lost!
Some areas of Rome are not covered by the metro. Or you can take the tram or bus.
There are tons of lines to choose from.
Line 81 for example… will take you to Piazza Venezia, Via Cola di Rienzo and St. Peter’s Basilica.
Instead, bus 64 will take you to San Pietro.
 
 
I recommend that you bring a newspaper or a book to read.
Bus trips to the Eternal City can also be “eternal”.
And waiting for them too, due to the traffic and especially the rush hour. This is why I advise you to go out earlier! You’ll need to anticipate everything otherwise you risk arriving late!
 
Line B will take you directly to the Colosseum, to the Circus Maximus. If you need it also stops at Termini Station where you can catch trains to go everywhere.
 

 

Autobus, image sourced from Pixabay

Timetables

 
According to the following timetables, the lines are in service:
 
FROM MONDAY TO THURSDAY AND SUNDAY
 
 
LINE A
in both directions between Battistini and Anagnina the first bus is at 5:30 am and the last one is at 11:30 pm;
LINE B
from Rebibbia to Laurentina and vice versa the first ride is at 5:30 am while the last ride is at 11:30 pm.
LINE B1
from Laurentina to Jonio and vice versa the first race is at 5:33 while the last race is at 23:24;
LINE C
the first ride is at 5.30 am while the last departure is at 11.30 pm;
 
 
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
 
LINE A
in both directions between Battistini and Anagnina the first bus is at 5:30 am; the last bus is at 1:30 am.
LINE B
from Rebibbia to Laurentina and vice versa the first ride is always at 5:30 am while the last ride is at 1:27 am;
LINE B1
from Laurentina to Jonio the first ride is at 5:30 am while the last ride is at 1:30 am;
LINE C
the first bus is at 5:30 in the morning while the last bus is at 1:30 at night;
 
If you need more information about timetables or tickets check this website here. You will find news about the lines and a little bit of history too!