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Saint Basil's Cathedral (Cathedral of the Protection of Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat) on Red Square in Moscow (Russia).

By Douglas Gruehl

A Gentleman in Moscow – Triumph over Adversity

Paramount+ scores a perfect 10 out of 10 with its brilliant A Gentleman in Moscow, starring the wonderfully talented Ewan McGregor. In his role as Count Alexander Rostov, the unrepentant aristocrat sentenced to life imprisonment under house arrest in the grand Metropol Hotel by the Bolsheviks, he is at once witty, cunning, charming, deceitful, industrious […]

The fall guy logo

By Douglas Gruehl

The Fall Guy or How Film Editing Failed

OMG, David Leitch’s The Fall Guy is SO SO long, it is painful. Do we blame the editor, who should have recognized the incredibly repetitive scenes, or the director, who insisted on the final cut? The 2 hours and 6 minutes could easily have been encapsulated into a mere 90 minutes of glorious fast-action stunts, […]

By Douglas Gruehl

Elsbeth is Columbo in a Skirt

Carrie Preston in the new show “Elsbeth” starring as lawyer turned super sleuth Elsbeth Tascioni is nothing short of brilliant as the 2024 version of Columbo but in a skirt and with a plethora of shopping bags in lieu of a dirty trench coat. (you just have to love a run-on sentence – LOL)   We […]

By Kaden Thaxton

The 4 Keys to Seeing All the Sights on Your Next European Vacation

Though speed-running the major sights in any city you visit is not the recommended way to enjoy your travels, sometimes we only have a set amount of time and want to make the most of it. On a recent trip to Europe, that was exactly the situation for not one, not two, but three cities […]

Killers of the Flower Moon

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By Douglas Gruehl

Killers of the Flower Moon? More like Killers of the Hours

OMG could Martin Scorcese get himself an editor? And I am asking politely. Three hours and 26 minutes to tell this primary story of greed, corruption and betrayal is, IMHO, 30-45 minutes too long. True, there are numerous subplots, but really Martin? Your viewing audience is not dense. Once you have established a fact, let’s […]

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By Floriane Gaber

Ceremonies, medals and all that stuff

The opening ceremony of the 2024 Olympic Games must take place on the Seine*. An exceptional fact because, since the restoration of the modern Olympics, this event generally takes place in a stadium. The medals, for their part, will be three in number (gold, silver, bronze). But do we know that the rewards have not […]

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By Vanessa Waithera

Why it’s impossible to be a better parent without healing your inner child

As parents, we’re all trying our best in this demanding role. But sometimes, we notice ourselves falling into old habits from our childhoods. Despite promising to do things differently with our kids, we find ourselves reacting in ways that remind us of our upbringing. It’s like a switch flips, and suddenly, we’re hearing our own […]

By Kaden Thaxton

My 5 Favorite Stops for Road Tripping the Southern United States

I’ve taken the trip between my current home in San Antonio, Texas, to my home town near Atlanta, Georgia, at least five or six times. It’s safe to say that by now I have seen a good bit of that journey through the southern U.S. over the course of the last few years, and yet […]

Bayard Rustin at news briefing on the Civil Rights March on Washington in the Statler Hotel, half-length portrait, seated at table

By Douglas Gruehl

RUSTIN shines a spotlight on our prejudices

Director George C. Wolfe brings “Rustin” to life with grace and ease as he tackles what for all should be a harsh reminder of the cruelty and prejudice rampant during the advent of the civil rights movement. This could not have been accomplished without the brilliant casting of Colman Domingo as the title character, Bayard […]

Leonard and Felicia Bernstein leaving for Israel, 1957

By Douglas Gruehl

Maestro – So Not A Symphony!

You have to give Bradley Cooper kudos for attempting to tell the story of the iconic legend Leonard Berstein and for directing himself, but, alas this film is not a symphony and barely equates to a concerto. At times Bradley brilliantly channels the legend without falling into the oft performance miring genre of parody but […]

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By Floriane Gaber

Chariots of Fire

In 1900 in Paris, the British completely dominated tennis, both individually and in doubles, notably by fielding the very first woman medalist at the Olympics. But it is within “mixed” teams that they establish themselves in polo. The notion of “nation” is not yet fixed at the Games and athletes from several countries can compete […]

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By Douglas Gruehl

Anatomy of a Fall or Was It Colonel Mustard in the Snowbank?

Is Justine Triet’s “Anatomy of a Fall” a courtroom thriller, a dramatic psychological study, or both, or simply a “true-crime whodunit” with all the twists and turns inherent in that genre? With the backdrop of Sandra Hüller’s all-consuming and brilliant portrayal of the main character Sandra, it is close to impossible to decide. She brings […]

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